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Watches and Technology

Automatic watches make up the large majority of mechanical watches sold today, but what is the difference? All mechanical watches have a mainspring, which stores the energy needed to power the watch. In a hand-wound watch, energy is stored in the mainspring by rotating the crown. Once that energy is depleted, this action is performed again. Automatic, or self-winding, watches have a rotating weight that winds the watch using the natural motion of the wearer’s wrist.

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Jonathan Arnold
14.08.2017

Widely considered to be one of, if not the most complex watch complication, striking watches are outside the remit of all but a few of the world’s most talented watchmakers. Not all striking watches are the same, however. Whilst the majority sound the time in one form or another, there are variations in the functioning of each different style. Broadly speaking, they fall into one of two categories: repeaters and sonneries. Read on to find out what the difference is between these two categories and to discover some great sonnerie watches.

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Jonathan Arnold
10.08.2017

The technical advances came quickly, such as increased water resistance, louder mechanical alarms, and more accurate timekeeping. Many of the world’s best known luxury watch brands continue to demonstrate their prowess in terms of technical advancements, over-engineering watches to perfection simply to prove that they can.

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Bert Buijsrogge
23.06.2017

For this article we go and compare two different watches that have been designed to have antimagnetic features from their first design. Starting off with the Rolex Milgauss watch and secondly the IWC Schaffhausen Ingenieur. Let’s explain a bit about what antimagnetic means for a mechanical watch.

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Robert-Jan Broer
20.06.2017

ETA, the company that initially founded by Eterna, has been part of the Swatch Group for decades. Their aim is to develop and create movements for watch manufactures, from relatively cheap quartz movements to mechanical movements with complications such as calendars and chronographs.

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Jorg Weppelink
24.05.2017

There are only a few brands within the traditional watch industry that are willing and able to evolve with the rapid changes taking place in today’s technological world. Most brands opt to stick to their traditional trade of developing and producing high-quality mechanical watches. One of the few traditional watch brands that has integrated technology in creative ways is Geneva-based Frédérique Constant. Frédérique Constant is well known for offering affordable luxury watches and they’ve recently introduced technological innovations that put them one step ahead of many competitors. These innovations include the Frédérique Constant Analytics, Frédérique Constant E-Strap, and Frédérique Constant Horological Smartwatch.

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The Geneva Seal, Patek Philippe Seal and seal of approval used by other brands outside of Geneva, only have one aim: to ensure that you, the consumer, not only receive a watch of prestige but one that has been fully tested under the strictest conditions. This only ensures confidence in the brands timepiece and above all, its longevity too.

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Robert-Jan Broer
06.01.2017

Fine mechanical engineering and sports don’t usually go well together. However, some brands have made testing their watches in extreme conditions an art form. Let’s talk about watches and sports.

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Isaac Wingold
03.01.2017

Of all the details that you’ll find on the dial of a vintage chronograph, it could be said that some of the most intriguing intricacies are the dial-surrounding scales that were formerly used to perform calculations. In many cases, these scales would have ultimately determined the target market for a particular watch and their legacy for years to come. Let’s now take a closer look at the various types of scales found on our favourite vintage chronographs and how one goes about using them.

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Too often we take it for granted that our sports watches make use of luminescence, which allows us to read the time perfectly in low and no lighting conditions, however, this wasn’t always the case. History shows getting us to this point in time (excuse the pun) was no easy feat and it did indeed cost lives too. As technology has evolved so has the legibility of the lume in our wristwatches and over the many years, a variety of materials and chemicals have been used too, though the first type of solutions were first seen in the early 20th century.

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